Waste Sector Among Top Five For Smallest Gender Pay Gap

The waste management sector is among the top five sectors in the UK with the smallest gender pay gap, according to new figures.

More than 10,000 large firms (including the public sector) have provided details of pay figures within their organisations. The findings show three-quarters (78%) pay men more than women.

Companies with more than 250 employees filed data based on a snapshot of their payroll taken on 5 April 2017. This is now a requirement and will be repeated on a yearly basis.

Senior executive vice president, Veolia, Estelle Brachliano – “We are proud of our programmes to increase diversity and inclusivity and this report, which accurately depicts our gender pay gap helps to show we are heading in the right direction”

The gender pay gap is the difference between the average hourly pay of women and men. It is not the same as equal pay, which compares a male and a female who work in the same or similar jobs, or carry out work of equal value.

The gender pay gap looks at overall average pay based on gender, regardless of job role, geographic location, market forces, grade or other influences on rates of pay.

Among the worst sectors for this pay gap are the financial and construction sectors – among the best is the waste sector.

Figures show “water supply, sewerage, waste management and remediation activities” achieved a median of 6.9% and a mean of 5.5%.

The median rate of pay is the middle salary, when average hourly rates of pay are ordered from lowest to highest. The median gender pay gap figure is the difference between the middle hourly rate of pay for men and women. The mean pay gap figure is the difference between average hourly earnings.

Worst Sectors For Gender Pay Gap

  1. Financial and insurance activities: 25.9% mean; 22.1% median
  2. Construction: 21.6% mean; 22.1% median
  3. Mining and quarrying: 21.1% mean; 19.6% median
  4. Arts, entertainment and recreation: 19.6% mean; 3.7% median
  5. Information and communication: 19.4% mean; 18% median

Best Sectors For Gender Pay Gap

  1. Water supply, sewerage, waste management and remediation activities: 5.5% mean; 6.9% median
  2. Public administration and defence; compulsory social security: 8.2% mean; 7.6% median
  3. Accommodation and food services: 8.4% mean; 1% median
  4. Human health and social work activities: 9.8% mean; 1.7% median
  5. Transportation and storage: 10.3% mean; 6.7% median

Waste management firm, Veolia, published a report that sets out the combined gender pay gap information for employees of VES UK plc, Veolia Water UK Ltd, Veolia Energy UK plc, and their UK respective subsidiaries.

In preparing the report, it analysed pay and bonus data for more than 13,000 employees.

It shows a mean pay gap of -5.5% and a median gap of 0.18%, indicating female employees are on average paid more than male.

Senior executive vice president Estelle Brachliano said: “We are proud of our programmes to increase diversity and inclusivity and this report, which accurately depicts our gender pay gap helps to show we are heading in the right direction.

“In 2017 we were recognised for our efforts in hiring more employees from diverse social backgrounds, including NEETs, ex-o enders and former military personnel by winning Veolia’s Global Social Initiatives award for Social Equity and Diversity. We are also advancing our apprenticeship, female-focused leadership and STEM programmes.

“My commitment is to ensure that these continue to improve the makeup of Veolia here in the UK and Ireland to ensure a successful and sustainable future for our workforce.”

Some companies missed the deadline (4 April) and have yet to reveal their data. Those that fail to publish their data face penalties.

To see published figures on gender pay gap in the sectors CLICK HERE


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