Cardiff Strives To Reduce Single-Use Plastic Waste Through Refill Scheme

Refill Cardiff has been launched with an aim of reducing single-use plastic waste and making it easier to get free tap water in public places across the city. 

Cardiff is the latest Welsh city or town to sign up to the Refill campaign. Participating businesses sign up to the Refill app and put a sticker in their window to show passers-by they are welcome to stop by and fill up their water bottle for free.

The Welsh Government is supporting the national roll-out of the scheme by City-To-Sea, with over 600 refill stations already signed up across Wales and more joining every week. The Welsh Government has also funded a Welsh language version of the Refill app.

Hannah Osman, Refill Wales Coordinator – “We are so excited to see Refill Cardiff join the Refill movement and making a real difference by reducing reliance on single-use plastics. Every time we refill a re-usable bottle we save on our own money and the planet’s resources, and all those individual refills add up to a huge impact.”

Cardiff University is a Refill ‘champion’. The University’s Water Research Institute, which is researching ‘plastics in freshwaters’, is aiming to get all accessible water stations on campus signed up to the app and encouraging other organisations across the city to join the scheme. Cardiff Council has also added public buildings to the app, such as libraries or Hub buildings.

There are currently 86 Refill stations in the Cardiff area. Refill is helping tap water be more widely available in public spaces like transport hubs, shopping centres and public buildings.

Hannah Blythyn said: ”Making drinking water more available is a really simple way to cut down on single-use plastics and is much better for the environment. 

“Earlier this year I announced my ambition to see Wales become the world’s first ‘Refill Nation’ and make asking for a water refill a social norm, so it’s really good to see our capital city join the scheme.” 

Hannah Osman, Refill Wales Coordinator, said: “We are so excited to see Refill Cardiff join the Refill movement and making a real difference by reducing reliance on single-use plastics. Every time we refill a re-usable bottle we save on our own money and the planet’s resources, and all those individual refills add up to a huge impact. 

“It’s great to see so many local businesses supporting Refill Cardiff by signing up to provide free refills.” 


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  1. Has nobody ever asked why people buy bottled water? It’s not because there aren’t any ‘convenient’ refill stations around: it’s because the mains supply in many parts of England and Wales tastes manky.
    When I moved to Lancashire I complained about the chemical taste from our supply to be told ‘it complies with EU drinking water standards’. So I don’t drink it (nor put it in our kettles) and buy bottled water instead.
    Get real Mr Gove: accept that the only positive way to sort our waste plastics problem is to build a network of re-processing plants and ensure they have the financial stability to offer long-term contracts to waste carriers that will ‘pull’ plastic waste out of the general waste stream.

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