BOC Purification Plant Opens At Cargill Manchester Site

This week marks the inauguration of BOC’s first UK CO2 purification plant at Cargill’s Manchester site.

The industrial symbiosis project aims to help towards achieving zero waste, as BOC, an industrial, medical and special gases provider, will is set to “transform” almost all of Cargill’s Manchester CO2 side stream into CO2, a valuable ingredient for the food & beverage industry, according to Cargill, which provides food, agriculture, financial and industrial products and services to the world.

The plant is expected to be one of the UK’s most reliable sources of CO2.

In 2016, the UK government set a new target to cut carbon emissions to 57 percent of 1990 levels by 2030. To meet this target, businesses must adapt and find innovative ways to reduce their environmental footprint.

For Cargill and BOC, this translates into a focus on using energy more efficiently, reducing greenhouse gases, drawing power from renewable energy sources and using water efficiently.

“By being a part of this innovative project, which allows us to re-purpose and recycle almost all of the CO2 side stream at Cargill Manchester, we are contributing to the environmental sustainability of our site.”

Cargill Starches & Sweeteners Manchester plant manager, Paul Kingston, said: “Cargill aims to be the most trusted source of sustainable products and services, and this agreement is another step towards reaching that goal.

“By being a part of this innovative project, which allows us to re-purpose and recycle almost all of the CO2 side stream at Cargill Manchester, we are contributing to the environmental sustainability of our site.”

Over the past decade, Cargill has reduced greenhouse gas intensity by 9 percent and has increased energy efficiency by 16 percent in its operations. Cargill has pledged to reduce its greenhouse gas intensity by a further 5 percent and to improve energy efficiency by the same percentage by 2020.

One of the processes at the Cargill site in Manchester is ethanol production. It is during this wheat fermentation process that raw CO2 is produced as a by-product. BOC will capture, purify and liquefy the gas so it is ready to be sold into the food & beverage industry for chilling and freezing as well as carbonating and dispensing drinks. Both companies have committed to a long-term partnership and to building a thriving business.

Oliver Pfann, head of BOC UK, Ireland and Africa, said: “BOC is delighted to be working with Cargill and to be supporting them on their sustainability journey. Carbon dioxide is a vital ingredient in the food and beverage industry, for example freezing pizzas, making soft drinks sparkle and keeping packaged foods fresh. This new plant will help ensure a more secure supply of this important product for UK customers.”

BOC has made a significant investment in the construction of the CO2 purification plant, which also includes the installation of 1,200 tonnes of bulk liquid storage, enabling better management during plant maintenance periods and in times of product shortages in the wider supply network.

The BOC CO2 purification plant is located on the Cargill starches and sweeteners plant in Trafford Park, Manchester.

The partnership enables both BOC and Cargill to invest in sustainable waste reduction solutions and in their long-term commitment to the city of Manchester and the UK market.


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