Survey Finds 15% Don’t Know What Electricals Can Be Recycled

weee-tvsFifteen percent of people surveyed by WEEE producer compliance scheme, REPIC, don’t know what electricals can be recycled.

The new survey revealed that half of UK households (13.2m) own at least three or more working TVs.

REPIC is responsible for funding the recycling of many discarded end-of-life TVs each year and found that in a league table of ownership, Birmingham came in first place, with Manchester charting in second and Leeds third.

 “Surveys such as these provide us with useful insight. It isn’t surprising that we’re increasingly collecting TVs but for REPIC the important message to stress is that old and broken TVs need to be recycled through the correct channels.”

However, most homeowners (67% percent) said they have at least one broken TV collecting dust.

When it comes to recycling TVs, a third of people polled said they wished they knew more – 15 percent admitted they had no idea which electricals, including TVs, could be recycled.

Screen size has also continued to creep up in the majority of homes – 41 percent of people surveyed claimed their TVs had 40 to 49 inch screens. Going for a home cinema experience, a further 17 percent polled said they went for a minimum screen size of 50 inches.

Bigger is better in Scotland too, where over a fifth of people surveyed had gone for screens above 50 inches – 22 percent in Glasgow and 28 percent in Edinburgh.

Despite the increase in flat screens, chunky old style TVs (CRT) and black and white TVs are still being watched – 6 percent of the over 60’s use them for their main household screen. Countrywide, Liverpudlians are the most attached to retro viewing and 1 in 10 people (9.8 percent) still watch TV this way.

Dr Philip Morton, CEO of REPIC, said: “Surveys such as these provide us with useful insight. It isn’t surprising that we’re increasingly collecting TVs but for REPIC the important message to stress is that old and broken TVs need to be recycled through the correct channels.

“Re-use is something that should be considered too – if they aren’t being used – and if they are in good working condition – they could be passed on to someone else or donated to a re-use centre.”


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