Gum Makers Must Contribute To £60m Annual Removal Cost, Councils Say

Chewing gum manufacturers must help more with the growing multi-million pound cost to local communities of removing discarded gum, with 99% of the nation’s main shopping streets now “spattered”, council leaders say.

The Local Government Association, which represents more than 370 councils in England and Wales, is calling for gum manufacturers to contribute to the £60 million annual gum removal cost to councils. It said this would enable councils, which are experiencing ongoing funding pressures, to fill in more than a million potholes.

Recent research by Keep Britain Tidy found 99% of main shopping streets and 64% of all roads and pavements are stained by chewing gum.

“Councils have no legal obligation to clear up the gum. They do it for the benefit of their shoppers, town centre users, businesses and residents; to make the pavements more attractive and the environment better. Councils want to work with the industry to find solutions to this ongoing problem.”

The average piece of gum costs about 3p to buy – but up to 50 times that to clean up per square metre (£1.50). Most chewing gum is not biodegradable and once it is trodden into the pavement this requires specialised equipment to remove. Gum manufacturers should also be switching to biodegradable and easier-to-remove chewing gum, the LGA says.

LGA Environment spokesperson Cllr Judith Blake said: “Chewing gum is a plague on our pavements. It’s ugly, it’s unsightly and it’s unacceptable.

“At a time when councils face considerable ongoing funding pressures, this is a growing cost pressure they could do without. Conventional chewing gum is not biodegradable and councils have to use specialist equipment to remove it, which is both time-consuming and very expensive.

“It is therefore reasonable to expect chewing gum manufacturers to help more, both by switching to biodegradable gum and by contributing to the cost of clearing it up. While awareness campaigns the industry is involved in have some value, they are not enough by themselves. The industry needs to go a lot further, faster, in tackling this issue.

“Councils have no legal obligation to clear up the gum. They do it for the benefit of their shoppers, town centre users, businesses and residents; to make the pavements more attractive and the environment better. Councils want to work with the industry to find solutions to this ongoing problem.”

The call comes just days after the Government published its National Litter Strategy for England.


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  1. A bit of bunkum really. If chewing gum isn’t biodegradable, why aren’t our town and city centre footpaths completely re-surfaced with gobs of gum? C’mon folks, many Councils aren’t even sweeping the streets properly never mind dealing with chewing gum. Why not make spitting out a gob of gum a littering offence that can be dealt with by a FPN? Then get the Councils’ litter patrols (that’s if they actually do it) out and deal with the miscreants.
    All this malarkey is a gag to increase income for Councils that will never be spent on street cleansing.

  2. How about introducing a requirement for manufacturers of gum to incorporate, say, 20% recycled gum in all their products? This would stimulate a market in collecting used gum from the streets. Manufacturers that use more than 20% would be able to claim recycling credits and trade these with other gum manufacturers. Green minded consumers would doubtless seek out products that had a greater proportion of recycled material.

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