Brexit Deal Conditional On UK Adhering To Environment Policies

A leaked European Parliament resolution has stated that the UK must adhere to EU environment and climate change policy and legislation if it wants to negotiate a future trading relationship after Brexit.

Documents published yesterday by the Guardian set out European Parliament’s 11-point resolution, outlining its demands from any Brexit deal.

The documents are the first EU response made public after Theresa May triggered Article 50 yesterday.

The resolution states: “Any future between the European Union and the United Kingdom is conditional on the United Kingdom’s continued adherence to the standards provided by the Union’s legislation and policies, in among others the fields of environment, climate change, the fight against tax evasion and avoidance, fair competition, trade and social policy”.

FCC – “We urgently need clarity as to what post-Brexit policy will look like for the UK waste and resources industry, and would urge the government to continue to foster its relationship with industry so that we can have a sensible discussion about what that should look like.”

The documents also outline demands to protect the EU’s own political and financial interests, including limiting any transitional deal to just three years and ruling out any special arrangements for the City of London.

It also demands the UK pay economic liabilities, rumoured to be in the region of €60bn, before leaving the EU.

Many are taking this resolution to signify a tough negotiating stance from Europe.

Commenting on the triggering of Article 50, Paul Taylor, CEO of FCC Environment, said: “Now that the Government has officially kick-started the process of leaving the European Union, there is an opportunity for the UK to create a set of policies for the waste and resources sector which are clearer in their aims and which better suit our country’s fiscal environment.

“With new research showing us that following EU waste policies post-Brexit could cost British businesses and households an additional £2 billion over the next 20 years, it is vital that the UK Government does not simply settle for the ‘one-size-fits-all’ approach which has been previously adopted by EU environmental directives.

“We urgently need clarity as to what post-Brexit policy will look like for the UK waste and resources industry, and would urge the government to continue to foster its relationship with industry so that we can have a sensible discussion about what that should look like.”


Read Similar

Eunomia To Identify Circular Economy Potential In Scotland’s Construction Sector

Resource Conference Cymru: Wales Considers 80% Recycling Target

The Values We Hold

LWARB Taskforce To Help Londoners Living In Flats Recycle More

What Resource Efficiency Can Do For The Industrial Strategy

Budget: Gov Looks To Extend Scope Of Landfill Tax To Illegal Disposals Of Waste

Budget: Resources Industry Calls For “Leadership & Ambition”

Views expressed in the comments below are those of the users and do not necessarily reflect the views of CIWM.
CIWM reserves the right to remove or amend any comments submitted for posting with no explanation or reason being given.

  1. The EU and its various entities exhibits an arrogance that’s quite unbelievable. They’ve had it their own way for so long they’ve lost the concept that this is a partnership we’re bowing out of, not the exclusive little Club of which membership is of worth.
    For example, one in five of all German cars is sold in the UK and I doubt if the Germans would be happy at losing 20% of their sales simply because of the EU’s belligerence.
    Another way of looking it is that if the EU doesn’t stop uttering threats of this nature, we might well simply stop sending the UK’s weekly fees for membership and see how long it lasts.
    Personally I doubt if the EU will exist in its present form by 2027 once we’re out of it.

Got something to say about this story?